Tag Archives: MLPTK

Essays regarding my Javascript command-line toolkit.

She Sells C Shells By The Seashore.

(This post, as are all my scientific works, is free of charge.)

I've written several shells in various languages, with varying success.

My most successful has been MLPTK: the blockbuster sensation that set the world
afire due to its author's controversial personality. (Or, rather, I ought to say
that it would have if the United Fascist States of America hadn't [EXPLETIVE] a
big pile of their rhetoric and censorship all over it.) I'll run you through its
schematic in a cursory manner with some discourse on my thoughts re: design.




Since I was about fifteen I dreamt of writing a parser. Specifically, the kind I
wanted to write was a shell: I intended to write a computer operating system, or
a text-mode adventure game similar to Zork or Skullkeep. I never did get 'round
to those goals, but I did write a shell (MLPTK) around age twenty five.

The first task was, of course, to effect a console with which I could debug the
shell as I wrote. This was easily accomplished using HTML4: my preferred tongue
for writing simplistic graphical user interfaces, and therefore the reason I so
often write computer programs using the Javascript language. I began with a text
field for command input and a rectangular textarea of dimensions 80 columns by
25 rows: gnome-terminal's canonical console width.

Then I needed to effect the console machinery in mlptk.js. This file contained a
function to bind console commands (other functions) to a global variable "tk."
The tk (Tool Kit) object contained a simplistic parser that split its commands
into legible chunks, processed them, then passed the processed arguments & input
to the bound function (all of which were subordinate to command line parsing).
This file is whence tk._bind() and tk._alias(): the Words of Power for beginner
MLPTK users to start adding their own modules. The file mlptk.js encapsulates a
command parser, history, console, log, input/output hooks, & related functions.

Because I had become sidetracked as I was writing, I then proceeded to write the
overload.js, which contains a few inefficient convenience functions overloading
Javascript's canonical primitive types (namely: Object, Array, & Function). The
library's most useful function was a JSON-like enumeration of object membership,
with a simplistic recursion sentinel (thanks, "==="!) for greater convenience.

Later on, I effected some changes to commands and the standard input / output
metaphor that permitted MLPTK users to use Javascript's objects within their
command lines and stdin/stdout. This could potentially be an improvement over
traditional Unix-like "bag of bytes" streams, although nothing is stopping any-
one from writing somewhat like fscanf(stdin, "%s", &classInstance)... except for
the facts that: (a) C does not work that way (easily circumvented via memcpy()),
and (b) input should never be written directly to memory without parsing it very
carefully beforehand (because of clever little Johnny Drop Tables).

For the finishing touches -- tee hee, I sound very much like the hosts of the TV
series "This Old House!" :) -- I added a rudimentary file system (cut buffer), &
some clickable buttons for command execution. Withal, MLPTK had become a bare-
bones shell with a functional console, and it was suitable to the task of basic
software design in Javascript. Not exactly Unix, but not too shabby!




MLPTK's parser is naive, but translates command lines in a way that allows argv
(the argument vector: an array containing the program's command line arguments)
to contain Javascript's primitive data types. This is actually an amusing trick,
because data need not be redundantly parsed by each pipelined module. Printing
to the console is effected by the module's return statement, but can also be
accomplished by invoking parent.dbug(), parent.println(), or parent.echo().

The module's standard input is accessed, within the module's anonymous function,
via this.stdin, which is an Array() object whose each element corresponds to the
output of the command at corresponding position in the command grouping that was
piped into this module. Segregation of grouped commands' output was also my idea
-- Bourne Again Shell on Linux certainly doesn't behave so -- & could be utile.

User input can be acquired mid-module with window.prompt(): an ugly hack, but
the only way MLPTK modules can properly acquire such input at runtime until I've
completed Quadrare Lexema and MLPTK can be implemented as an operating system.
Until then, input is more efficaciously processed via argv & stdin.

Quadrare Lexema is a Bison-like Look Ahead Left-to-Right (LALR) parser generator
I wrote in Javascript. I intend to use it supplant MLPTK's currently hand-hacked
parsing mechanism and implement a scheduled operating system in Javascript. This
would be substantially similar to what ChromeOS seems to have arrived upon. Of
course, such an operating system would be slow, so don't hold your breath.

Incidentally: Polynom, one of the modules, is a complicated parser in itself. It
 can shorten the time needed to reduce polynomials to like terms.
 However, I didn't test it much (because it's an informal parser),
 so don't use it to do your homework for you. Same with matloc.




In the years since I was twelve I've thought often of operating system design &
specifications thereof. I've arrived at the conclusion that computer programs
are most properly represented as tokens in a formal parser: they execute in time
to this parser's schedule, and are themselves interpreted by another parser. Of
course, this approach to the procedure of computer operation is inefficient, but
offers the several advantages of hypervisory oversight (which grants the OS a
certain degree of control over hacking / exploitation of bugs & an opportune HAL
or Hardware Abstraction Layer that may provide an easier way to load drivers) &
a more easily altered operating system (because, in this hypothetical parser, it
doesn't have a thousand tangled spaghetti pieces sticking keyboard hooks into
each other all day long).

Of course, because all computer programs and even the central processing unit
itself can be considered finite state automata (Alan Turing's brilliant axiom,
which cracked the German "Enigma" machine), the whole computer can be seen as a
parser. Likewise can any parser be seen as a miniature computermachine of a sort
-- therefore a shell is a subset of any graphical OS, as Microsoft demonstrated
with Windows '95 & '98 (which were built atop MicroSoft Disk Operating System).

But what kind of shell underpins the operating system? It could be interactive
or not, or some shell-like infrastructure accessible only by way of an API. 
Regardless what, something resembling a programming language comprises the basis
of any computer operating system, because they're sufficiently complex as must
require parsing a variety of input in a parser-like way. Due to the relative
ease of writing in high-level interpreted languages, the thought of writing a
whole operating system as an interpreted script is tempting. Viz: Stanford, ITS,
and the Lisp machines on which JEDGAR found his legendary home.

I suppose any OS can be built as a kind of hypervisory shell, in which all code
experiences its runtime within a virtual machine (this particular kind of VM is
called a "sandbox;" for instance, Firefox's Javascript sandbox). However, like
all sandboxes, it is not impregnable, and its boundaries are porous. This means
computer viruses will always be, but it also means the OS can play fun tricks
with scheduling (such as system requisites rescheduling themselves, or weighted
time slices) and interfaces between programs (say, pipes?) can be hypervised.

The comparisons I draw between mathematically-oriented software design (parser
theory, formal grammars of the sort one writes in extended Backus-Naur format, &
object oriented -- especially origin-symbol oriented -- systems programming) and
Microsoft's infamous XBOX Hypervisor are intentional. Because carefully written
parsers can sandbox the instructions they interpret, and because artificially
generated automatons are can be verified by way of mathematics, OS design can be
(I suppose) implemented as a modular series of sandboxed sandboxes. Each sandbox
could change slightly over time (by modifying the EBNF, or whatever, notation of
its grammar) so that computer viruses are more difficult to write. Additionally,
each sandbox could contain a set of heuristic anti-virus instructions and fire-
walls (black- or white-lists) to permit the human system operator to choose when
certain instructions (hard disk access, network, etc) are allowed to execute.

Needless to say, the benefits of a fully interpreted & hypervised computer OS
are potentially vast and of great benefit to humanity. I'm hopeful for future
developments in this field, but can't spare the time for research. Because this
and all my briefs & lectures are in the public domain, I encourage scientists to
take my "ball" and run with it. But, as in the science of basketball -- that is,
the mathematical study of geometry -- don't forget to dribble.




Because that discourse was in fact quite vapid (until I've written it myself),
here's today's most amusing quote from fortune(6):
"
 I
 am
 not
 very
 happy
 acting
 pleased
 whenever
 prominent
 scientists
 overmagnify
 intellectual
 enlightenment
"
:)
Advertisements

Using a Briefcase™? Briefly, a Use Case™.

Briefcase: a special kind of folder in Microsoft Windows, which synchronizes its
 contents with another briefcase of the same name when detected. Used
 to keep volatile documents on floppy disks & USB flash drives without
 constantly copying and pasting the contents of the whole disk every
 time it moves from workstation to workstation. Like an rsync daemon.

Use case: in the studies of software design & architecture, a storyboard sketch,
 or supposition about what a user expects or how s/he'll behave. E.g..
 This would be the initial node of a flowchart, a branch in main(), GUI
 dialog panes, or some interaction of user with program.
 Additionally, analysis of hostile users and newbies ("misuse case").




I am still moribund ("deadlocked," or "sick to death") by a headache that has
become cerebral palsy. I have been unable to concentrate on my plans this year.

Speaking of contributions to science, you can find my (literally) auriferous
portfolio at the magnanimous MediaFire (they're not just for pirates!):

    https://www.mediafire.com/folder/kr2bjyn1k3gjr/mlptk-recent
    (Download & read the CARGO-MANIFEST.TXT to ascertain the contents of the archives you seek.)
    WARNING: ADULTS ONLY. (Explicit sexual content.)
    Videlicet is still kind of broken. DiffWalk, too, may be faulty.

The hyperlink will lead you to a MediaFire directory. I have added new archives
(for bandwidth conservationists). The file CARGO-MANIFEST.TXT describes all the
contents: _download and read it first_ if you want to know what's in them there
archives, which total over one hundred Megabytes, &/or retrieve your preference.

What's new: kanamo & transl8 (in MLPTK), Mutate-o-Matic, Videlicet, & DiffWalk.
(I said MLPTK was officially dead, but will I let it rest? How about no...)
Archivists curating art galleries downloaded from social networks will love
Videlicet, which solves the vexing twin problems of automatic attribution and
re-configurable data mining. (For those pesky copy protection mechanisms.
Videlicet.py easily cuts through Web galleries and markup up to 1/4" thick.)

I even threw in the exprimental upnnas: yea, truly this is an epic day.
(^- That line alludes to one of the _Juicy Cerebellum_'s author's asides.)

The remainder of this briefing describes the salient points of a Python script I
wrote to automatically collate issues of my portfolio. Long story short: "diff."




Because the large size of the archives I upload has become problematic, I have
established a ramshackle mechanism to prepare smaller files for anyone concerned
about bandwidth conservation. (MediaFire reports only two Gigabytes since last
year, which is no big deal, but I certanly wasn't helping. Also I couldn't think
of much else to do.) In case you cared, the usual issues with bandwidth are
constriction & latency: to reuse Senator Ted Stevens' "tubes" metaphor, how wide
the tube is and how long it is, and either of these can alter an observer's
perception of the pressure of fluid forced through the pipe. "When the tubes get
full, things can't get through" -- like dead bodies, or the new episode of Veep.

Metaphorically one half of this mechanism is a portable diff utility: DiffWalk.
The other half is a shell script that identifies changes to the directory tree.
Neither is aught remarkable but why don't I talk your ear off about them anyway?

Diff is a program similar to cmp, used to compare two files and describe their
discrepancies. In common use on Unixlike systems, it is employed to create patch
files that require less time to transmit via point-to-point telecommunication
than would be needed to transmit the whole file whenever it changed. Because it
is so useful an algorithm, and because I've never seen one for Windows (except
in the Berkeley Utilities), I made (but didn't test) a portable one in Python.

DiffWalk is a walking collater that creates patches similar to diff's.
Although the two are not interoperable, they operate in the same manner:
by determination of where the files differ and description of the differences.
Therewith, a "new" file can be reconstructed from an "old" file plus a patch --
hypothetically, with according decrease of network bandwidth load.

Although the script is a few hundreds of lines long, the scanner (the part that
goes through the file looking for the interesting bits: such as, in this case,
the positions where the new file differs from the old) is one tenth that size.
As you've observed in my other software, I do without proper parsers & grammar.
This renders my work brief, vulgar, and full of bugs, but sometimes legible.




def diff (old_lines, new_lines): #fmt: old_offset old_lines new_lines\nlines\n
 patch_file = [ patch_copacetic_leadin ];
 
 scan_line = ""; # Compute MD5 checksums for both files...
 old_md5sum = hashlib.md5();
 for line in old_lines: old_md5sum.update(line);
 old_md5sum = old_md5sum.hexdigest();
 scan_line = "%s\t" % (old_md5sum);
 new_md5sum = hashlib.md5();
 for line in new_lines: new_md5sum.update(line);
 new_md5sum = new_md5sum.hexdigest();
 if new_md5sum == old_md5sum: return None; # same file? then no patch req'd.
 scan_line += "%s\n" % (new_md5sum);
 
 patch_file.append(scan_line); # Second line: old_md5 new_md5
 
 oi = 0; ol = len(old_lines); ni = 0; nl = len(new_lines);
 tally = 0; scan_line;
 unique_new_lines = set(new_lines) - set(old_lines);
 
 while ni < nl: # 2 phases: scan "same" lines, then diff lines
 oi = 0; tally = 0;
 while oi < ol and old_lines[oi] != new_lines[ni]: oi += 1;
 scan_line = "%d\t" % (oi); #Index in "old" file to cat some of its lines
 while oi < ol and ni < nl and old_lines[oi] == new_lines[ni]:
 tally += 1; ni += 1; oi += 1;
 scan_line += "%d\t" % (tally); # Number of lines to cat from "old" file
 tally = 0; next_ni = ni;
 while ni < nl and new_lines[next_ni] in unique_new_lines:
 tally += 1; next_ni += 1;
 scan_line += "%d\n" % (tally); # Number of lines to cat from "new" file
 
 patch_file.append(scan_line);
 patch_file.extend(new_lines[ni : next_ni]);
 ni = next_ni;
 # end while (scan the files, outputting the patch protocol format)
 
 return patch_file;
# end function diff: returns diff-style patches as writelines() compatible lists




Concise and transpicuous:
 1. Tally runs of lines that already existed in the old file. (Scan phase.)
 2. Tally runs of lines that do not exist in the old file. (Diff phase.)
 3. Print a patch format that permits ordered reconstitution of the lines.
 4. Repeat until the entire new file can be reconstructed from patch + old.

Here, Python's set()s abstract away a tedious series of repetitive scans.
Without set or a like data type, I'd have to either hash the "old" file's lines
myself (and waste time writing another binary tree) or loop through it all again
and again for each line of the new file. (That would be due to the fact that, if
lines had been moved about instead of simply moved apart by interjection, then a
lockstep scanner would mistakenly skip some and the patch file would be larger.)

There is no capacity to patch binary files, but DW still detects when they have
changed, and will write a copy into the patch directory. I assume that changes
to binary files are due to transcoding, and therefore the patch'd be just as big
-- some kinds of binary files, such as SQL databases, don't behave this way and
can be patched in the same manner as I patch text files, but I don't use them.
(If you extend the algorithm to databases or executables, don't forget to review
 the pertinent file formats and open the files in binary mode. :)

The rest of the script is a wrapper handling directory traversal and file I/O.

As `info diff` artfully states, "computer users often find occasion to ask how
2 files differ." The utility of a script like DiffWalk is therefore not limited
to patching, but compression protocol is its primary employment on my system. (I
still use `diff` for quotidian difference queries because DW isn't in my $PATH.) 
Likewise, the automatic collation of updates, such as moved and deleted files,
is a pleasant amelioration to the task of finding what's changed in an archive
since the last published edition. DiffWalk now handles these tasks for me.

If you'd like a better solution to the "Briefcase Problem" (how to synchronize
files across multiple installations with minimal time and fuss), don't forget to
stop by the manual pages for "diff", "patch", and "rsync".

Automaton Empyreum: the Key to Pygnition. (Trivial File Transfer Protocol edition.)

(I have implemented the Trivial File Transfer Protocol, revision 2, in this milestone snapshot. If you have dealt with reprogramming your home router, you may have encountered TFTP. Although other clients presently exist on Linux and elsewhere, I have implemented the protocol with a pair of Python scripts. You’ll need a Python interpreter, and possibly Administrator privileges (if the server requires them to open port 69), to run them. They can transfer files of size up to 32 Megabytes between any two computers communicating via UDP/IP. Warning: you may need to pull out your metaphorical monkey wrench and tweak the network timeout, or other parameters, in both the client and server before they work to your specification. You can also use TFTP to copy files on your local machine, if for whatever reason you need some replacement for the cp command. Links, courtesy of MediaFire, follow:

Executable source code (the programs themselves, ready to run on your computer): http://www.mediafire.com/file/rh5fmfq8xcmb54r/mlptk-2017-01-07.zip

Candy-colored source code (the pretty colors help me read, maybe they’ll help you too?): http://www.mediafire.com/file/llfacv6t61z67iz/mlptk-src-hilite-2017-01-07.zip

My life in a book (this is what YOUR book can look like, if you learn to use my automatic typesetter and tweak it to make it your own!): http://www.mediafire.com/file/ju972na22uljbtw/mlptk-book-2017-01-07.zip

)

Title is a tediously long pun on "Pan-Seared Programming" from the last lecture.
Key: mechanism to operate an electric circuit, as in a keyboard.
Emporium: ein handelsplatz; or, perhaps, the brain.
Empyreuma: the smell/taste of organic matter burnt in a close vessel (as, pans).
Lignite: intermediate between peat & bituminous coal. Empyreumatic odor.
Pignite: Pokémon from Black/White. Related to Emboar & Tepig (ember & tepid).
Pygmalion (Greek myth): a king; sculptor of Galatea, who Aphrodite animated.

A few more ideas that pop up often in the study of computer programming: which,
by the way, is not computer science. (Science isn't as much artifice as record-
keeping, and the records themselves are the artifact.)

MODULARITY
As Eric Steven Raymond of Thyrsus Enterprises writes in "The Art of Unix
Programming," "keep it simple, stupid." If you can take your programs apart, and
then put them back together like Lego(TM) blocks, you can craft reusable parts.

CLASSES
A kind of object with methods (functions) attached. These are an idiom that lets
you lump together all your program's logic with all of its data: then you can
take the class out of the program it's in, to put it in another one. _However,_
I have been writing occasionally for nearly twenty years (since I was thirteen)
and here's my advice: don't bother with classes unless you're preparing somewhat
for a team effort (in which case you're a "class" actor: the other programmers
are working on other classes, or methods you aren't), think your code would gain
from the encapsulation (perhaps you find it easier to read?), or figure there's
a burning need for a standardized interface to whatever you've written (unlikely
because you've probably written something to suit one of your immediate needs:
standards rarely evolve on their own from individual effort; they're written to
the specifications of consortia because one alone doesn't see what others need).
Just write your code however works, and save the labels and diagrams for some
time when you have time to doodle pictures in the margins of your notebook, or
when you _absolutely cannot_ comprehend the whole at once.

UNIONS
This is a kind of data structure in C. I bet you're thinking "oh, those fuddy-
duddy old C dinosaurs, they don't know what progress is really about!" Ah, but
you'll see this ancient relic time and again. Even if your language doesn't let
you handle the bytes themselves, you've got some sort of interface to them, and
even if you don't need to convert between an integer and four ASCII characters
with zero processing time, you'll still need to convert various data of course.
Classes then arise which simulate the behavior of unions, storing the same datum
in multiple different formats or converting back and forth between them.
(Cue the scene from _Jurassic Park,_ the film based on Michael Crichton's book,
 where the velociraptor peeks its head through the curtains at a half-scaffolded
 tourist resort. Those damn dinosaurs just don't know when to quit!)

ACTUALLY, VOID POINTERS WERE WHAT I WAS THINKING OF HERE
The most amusing use of void*s I've imagined is to implement the type definition
for parser tokens in a LALR parser. Suppose the parser is from a BNF grammar:
then the productions are functions receiving tokens as arguments and returning a
token. Of course nothing's stopping you from knowing their return types already,
but what if you want to (slow the algorithm down) add a layer of indirection to
wrap the subroutines, perhaps by routing everything via a vector table, and now
for whatever reason you actually _can't_ know the return types ahead of time?
Then of course you cast the return value of the function as whatever type fits.

ATOMICITY, OPERATOR OVERLOADING, TYPEDEF, AND WRAPPERS
Washing brights vs darks, convenience, convenience, & convenience, respectively.
Don't forget: convenience helps you later, _when_ you review your code.

LINKED LISTS
These are a treelike structure, or should I say a grasslike structure.
I covered binary trees at some length in my fourth post, titled "On Loggin'."

RECURSION
The reason why you need recursion is to execute depth-first searches, basically.
You want to get partway through the breadth of whatever you're doing at this
level of recursion, then set that stuff aside until you've dealt with something
immensely more important that you encountered partway through the breadth. Don't
confuse this with realtime operating systems (different than realtime priority)
or with interrupt handling, because depth-first searching is far different than
those other three topics (which each deserve lectures I don't plan to write).

REALTIME OPERATING SYSTEMS, REALTIME PRIORITY, INTERRUPT HANDLING
Jet airplanes, video games versus file indexing, & how not to save your sanity.

GENERATORS
A paradigm appearing in such pleasant languages as Python and Icon.
Generators are functions that yield, instead of return: they act "pause-able,"
and that is plausible because sometimes you really don't want to copy-and-paste
a block of code to compute intermediate values without losing execution context.
Generators are the breadth-first search to recursion's depth-first search, but
of course search algorithms aren't all these idioms are good for.
Suppose you wanted to iterate an N-ary counter over its permutations. (This is
similar to how you configure anagrams of a word, although those are combinations
-- for which, see itertools.combinations in the Python documentation, or any of
the texts on discrete mathematics that deal with combinatorics.) Now, an N-ary
counter looks a lot like this, but you probably don't want a bunch of these...
    var items = new Array(A, B, C, D, ...);       // ... tedious ...
    var L = items.length;                         // ... lines ...
    var nary = new Array(L);                      // ... of code ...
    for (var i = 0; i < L; nary[i++] = 0) ;       // ... cluttering ...
    for (var i = L - 1; i >= 0 && ++nary[i] == L; // ... all ...
        nary[i--] = ((i < 0) ? undefined : 0)     // ... your other ...
    ) ; // end for (incrementation)               // ... computations ...
... in the middle of some other code that's doing somewhat tangentially related.
So, you write a generator: it takes the N-ary counter by reference, then runs an
incrementation loop to update it as desired. The counter is incremented, where-
upon control returns to whatever you were doing in the first place. Voila!
(This might not seem important, but it is when your screen size is 80 by 24.)



NOODLES AND DOODLES, POMS ON YOUR POODLES, OODLES AND OODLES OF KITS & CABOODLES
(Boodle (v.t.): swindle, con, deceive. Boodle (n.): gimmick, device, strategy.)
Because this lecture consumed only about a half of the available ten thousand
characters permissible in a WordPress article, here's a PowerPoint-like summary
that I was doodling in the margins because I couldn't concentrate on real work.
Modularity: perhaps w/ especial ref to The Art of Unix Programming. "K.I.S.S."
Why modularity is important: take programs apart, put them together like legos.
Data structures: unions, classes.
Why structures are important: atomicity, op overloading, typedefs, wrappers.
linked lists: single, double, circular. Trees. Binary trees covered in wp04??
recursion: tree traversal, data aggregation, regular expressions -- "bookmarks"
Generators. Perhaps illustrate by reference to an N-ary counter?

AFTER-CLASS DISCUSSION WITH ONE HELL OF A GROUCHY ETHICS PROFESSOR
Suppose someone is in a coma and their standing directive requests you to play
some music for them at a certain time of day. How can you be sure the music is
not what is keeping them in a coma, or that they even like it at all? Having
experienced death firsthand, when I cut myself & bled with comical inefficiency,
I can tell you that only the dying was worth it. The pain was not, and I assure
you that my entire sensorium was painful for a while there -- even though I had
only a few small lacerations. Death was less unpleasant with less sensory input.
I even got sick of the lightbulb -- imagine that! I dragged myself out of the
lukewarm bathtub to switch the thing off, and then realized that I was probably
not going to die of exsanguination any time soon and went for a snack instead.

AFTER-CLASS DISCUSSION WITH ONE HELL OF A GROUCH
"You need help! You are insane!"
My 1,000 pages of analytical logic versus your plaintive bleat.

Yarredux!

(Here be an update, as of November 8th, 2016. Me old war wound be actin’ up too much, and I think these’ll be the last for some time.

http://www.mediafire.com/file/ib2ezsch9jfz2te/mlptk-2016-11-08.zip

http://www.mediafire.com/file/n5pvhc8snk7nkcn/mlptk-src-hilite-2016-11-08.zip

http://www.mediafire.com/file/afkkza6ywlfrc75/mlptk-book-2016-11-08.zip

)

Ahoy, mateys. Today be the nineteenth of September — ye’d be better knowin’ it as International Talk Like A Pirate Day — and I’ll wager that upon this fine occasion ye’d be askin’ yerselves: “where’s me booty? ”

Well, and I’d make a poor excuse for a captain if I couldn’t deliver ye at least that! (But avast: ye might be findin’ it somewhat unholy, and parental discretion be even more advisable than in previous revisions.) I have prepared for ye a fine trove o’ source code, the likes of which are fit for Kings. Although me mother be the only one likely to find it interestin’, I’ve also put the finishin’ touches on me preliminary sketch of a typesetter for me book: “Yawnie’s Whole: the Complete Yawnie, for the Yawnie Enthusiast.” These be available in three chests, or what ye might be callin’ “Zip Arr-chives,” which I be uploadin’ to Mediafire as per usual.

Me latest revision of MLPTK be here…
http://www.mediafire.com/download/t93x0txsfvgp2pz/mlptk-2016-09-19.zip
… and be comprisin’ not much different from the last MLPTK, again as usual, except that I were fixin’ bugs. I report with most contrition that Polyfac be a failure: I be tryin’ to return me attention to the other tasks I failed to complete this year.

If ye prefer to be tastin’ th’ rainbow, a set of syntax-highlighted HTML documents illustratin’ the source code be here…
http://www.mediafire.com/download/o3cz1rghyp6j5h4/mlptk-src-hilite-2016-09-19.zip
… they scry as nearly as possible alike to me own development environment.

Would ye like me book? I be certain to update and revise it as time be passin’, but who knows if me accounts shan’t be commandeered in the interstice? If ye be at all interested, don’t hesitate: supplies be unlimited, but tempus fugit…
http://www.mediafire.com/download/xv3h8xdslbscwc9/mlptk-book-2016-09-19.zip
… and, someday, me literature be gone forever, as literature inevitably shall.

And there be little more to say about this revision, as I’ve prepared no new lectures since April.

In the meantime, have ye noticed how beautiful life can be sometimes? Quite apart from th’ hardship and pain, there be especial bounty of resources. If ye be readin’ this, then ye would be privileged to Internet access, which are a rare treasure: there be all sorts o’ literature & art to be found, plenty of amusin’ diversions, and certainly no shortage of comely wenches to descry.

Me meaning be: ye could probably spend yer whole lives havin’ not a thing but a netbook computer, occasional access to electrical power, and some sort o’ shelter to protect ye from the elements. A “sex tent,” if ye will: just be addin’ some wenches. Why, I can imagine that no few individuals upon this blasted globe could be livin’ their lives contented with a shelter and a wench — wenches of the world bein’ blessed not to be needin’ anywench else.

Childhood be another of those times. As I grew, I were witness to what some would be describin’ as the “Wild West” of the World Wide Web. Nearly every outlet of popular culture were findin’ its way into troves and hoardes shared worldwide by generous scoundrels (and belligerent litigious bilge rats) to an audience of hundreds of millions. The vast serpent of DHTML and jQuery had only just been sighted far afore, and the stars fated to portend swashbucklin’ adventure at every second of the compass.

There was, too, a massive population of reputable sailors upon the vast waters of cyberspace. I remember some of the finest: OverClocked ReMix, VGMusic. Angelfire, Tripod, and Geocities. Neopets. The Merchant Guild. 4chan. So many more motes be floatin’ in the eye of history that I cannot even recount. Ah, the world were bigger then, and me eyes wide in childlike wonder.

Well, and it were the best of times, but me swashbucklin’ days be sadly behind me. (Arr, insofar as I cannot swash without me bucks! Besides that, me galleon be in disrepair, and overhaul be veritably a tribulation. However, as usual, be sendin’ me no money, for I cannot guarantee that it shall ever arrive; nor could I be certain it would help if it did.) As it happened, although I were studyin’ me life’s work throughout me life, me attention were turnin’ too late to serious programmin’ (peradventure, alas!), and circumstances be such that I envision failure to accomplish writing the parts of me portfolio I’d intended to finish this year.

(Happily I were not askin’ for research grants, considerin’ me doldrums.)

I be in pain; and, in light of this, tried to pass along what few ideas I were able to sustain the concentration to write before I be entirely unable to do so. They be in me ephemerides, toward page 950.

The spring be another of those times when life be less painful than it’s usually. I tell ye there be nothing like the sensation of warm sunlight on yer skin for the first time in months. Which are even assumin’ ye survived th’ winter — in the frigid North, for example, ye might be a popsicle if ye aren’t careful.

And let’s be not forgettin’ lemons…

Ah, but me ramblin’ be more piteous than a scurvy dog.

Enjoy me work.

 

AVAST, MATEYS!

Here be a ninja update fer th’ new year, 2017.

Ever wanted t’ shred data? Here be a tip:

dd -if /dev/random -of /dev/sda

will shred your ENTIRE HARD DISK /dev/sda irreversibly.

The file system be destroyed the instant you hit enter. There be no confirmation.

Shred it all night long, then when ye wake in the mornin’ do this before work:

dd -if /dev/urandom -of /dev/sda

to drop a load on yer disk that be heavier’n fifteen spars on a dead man’s chest.

Seriously. This be how to erase yer disks so thoroughly even the C.I.A. shall never espy yer dirty secrets.

Sleep tight, mateys.

A Midsummer Report.

Here are some updates on my progress:

https://www.mediafire.com/?zcc0pq81u001k4w (or http://www.mediafire.com/download/zcc0pq81u001k4w/mlptk-2016aug12.zip )

^- This one contains a snapshot of my MLPTK directory as of last night shortly before I endured my nightly battle with pain that keeps me awake. It’s a couple’a megs (zipped) or about three megabytes (inflated). Download this if you only want the MLPTK software and reference materials.

 

https://www.mediafire.com/?3lxoqrocmmm5byc ( or http://www.mediafire.com/download/3lxoqrocmmm5byc/mlptk-report-2016-08-12.zip )

^- This one contains a tasty treat! I have rewritten my automatic typesetter for today’s report, and there are now available some syntax highlighted HTML documents that make the code very much easier to read. There are some cute PDFs, too, for printing. DocBook was a very convenient format to get started with, but I hope with future revisions I will graduate from the training wheels and learn to use LaTeX / PostScript. The report is about thirty megabytes (zipped) or fifty megabytes (inflated). Download this if you would like to preserve my work in “Dead Tree” format. (Yes, I’m pretty sure that all the PDFs with my name on them are actually my own work, thus the “Author” bit in the typesetter. I deleted all the PDFs that I identified as not being my own work. Yes, it will require over four hundred pages if you print it. No, I’m not done writing.)

 

I have been working on MLPTK, and other projects, but have nothing of any value to report. Sadly, I stalled-out on QL and everything, and I don’t think I can publish anything complete in 2016 as I had hoped.

However, I _have_ made a good run at finishing every part of QL that I set out to write last Christmas. Also, I have run a quick test on the Firefox bundled with a recent version of Lubuntu: ironically, the _horrendous QL speed bug_ has no perceptible effect on execution time in that version! (I’m still going to try and fix it, though, because my development machine is still on the elder version.)

Apart from crashing and burning with QL, I have begun a new C++ project called Sparkster (after the name of the titular protagonist of Rocket Knight Adventures) which will be a simple exercise in simulating kinetics; I still haven’t started YawniePong 2 because I need to begin a three dimensional rendering library for Javascript if I want to make it into Return to Thunderdome; and I have written a new module for MLPTK, based on Polynom, called Polyfac — although it is practically useless.

Since the last revision I have also written a few other modules, and fixed sundry bugs. See the history log for more details.

 

P.S. The header image easter-egg has also changed. Again.